Number of school dropouts on the rise

Number of school dropouts on the rise

The number of Cyprus’ school dropouts in 2019 stood at 9.2 per cent, marking a notable increase from 5.2 per cent in 2015.

 

The number of Cyprus’ school dropouts in 2019 stood at 9.2 per cent, marking a notable increase from 5.2 per cent in 2015.

While Cyprus’ figures have risen steadily since 2015, the figures remain below the EU’s average of 10.2 per cent – and far below the 30 per cent seen throughout much of Turkey.

The data for 2019, provided by Eurostat, places Cyprus comfortably among prosperous nations such as France, Germany, and Ireland.

But it shows a stubborn increase for Cyprus, which in 2016 marked 7.6 per cent of young people leaving school early or going into training. In 2018 it stood at 7.8 per cent.

The lowest share of dropouts was recorded in Jadranska Hrvatska (Croatia), 1.7 per cent, followed by the Greek region of Kentriki Makedonia, 2.0 per cent.

In Turkey, however, some areas recorded the rate of young school leavers as high as 52.6 per cent in 2019 – in Sanliurfa province. In Istanbul it stood at 24.6 per cent in 2019.

But Cyprus recorded the lowest share of upper secondary students enrolled in vocational training programmes, at just 16.7 per cent. In 2018, a peak of 76.1 per cent was recorded in Severozápad (Czechia).

Data from 2016 shows another notable trend in Cyprus: three out of every five women continue their studies after high-school, 62.1 per cent.

This is in sharp contrast to men, where only two out of every five continue their studies, or 43.7 per cent. The figures show that in 2002 some 35.9 per cent of Cypriot tertiary students were male and 36.1 per cent female, a gap of only 0.2 per cent.

Similarly, in 2002, around 22.5 per cent of boys were high-school dropouts compared with 8.2 per cent of girls. In 2016, although both numbers have halved in line with the government’s target of an overall 10 per cent drop, 11.5 per cent of boys still dropped out early last year compared with only 4.3 per cent of girls.

The gaps between male and female is being replicated across the EU.  In 2002 some 24.5 per cent of women on average were in tertiary education across the bloc. In 2016, that figure was 43.9 per cent. And while the percentage of men was still slightly lower than women at 22.6 per cent in 2002, the gap widened considerably by 2016 when males made

Schools 13

 

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