Full list of 145 countries waiting for first vaccine doses as 10 nations dominate supplies

Full list of 145 countries waiting for first vaccine doses as 10 nations dominate supplies

 

More than 130 countries still haven’t begun vaccinating against the coronavirus, with 10 nations having administered 82 per cent of the jabs.

The latest figures from Our World in Data show the UK – which has so far rolled out nearly 18 million first doses – is among a select few countries dominating supplies.

The others are the US, China, India, Israel, Brazil, Turkey, UAE, Germany and Russia.

However, there are others listed for having not started roll-outs, including New Zealand, South Korea and Australia, which have already got a firmer handle on the virus than many others.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, meanwhile, was pictured receiving his vaccine over the weekend as the country prepared to begin offering jabs to the general public.

The UN Secretary-General António Guterres has called for more efforts to be made to spread out the inoculations, calling progress “wildly uneven and unfair”.

Speaking at a security council open meeting last week, Mr Guterres said: “Vaccine equity is the biggest moral test before the global community.

“Defeating Covid-19, now that we have begun to have the scientific capacity to do so, is more important than ever.

“The rollout of Covid-19 vaccines is generating hope.

“At this critical moment, vaccine equity is the biggest moral test before the global community.

“We must ensure that everybody, everywhere, can be vaccinated as soon as possible.”

So far, over 209 million doses have been administered in 92 countries, with the world’s population at 7.7 billion.

According to Bloomberg’s Vaccine Tracker, an average of 2,470,772 jabs are being given out a day.

Currently, 2,493,795 people have been confirmed to have died worldwide from the virus, amid 112,589,753 reported cases.

The Secretary-General went on to say if the virus continues to spread “like wildfire” anywhere in the world it will “mutate again and again” and potentially corrupt current vaccines.

“Those affected by conflict and insecurity are at particular risk of being left behind,” he said.

“When pandemic strikes, we are only safe if everyone is safe.”

He said the COVAX programme, a global tool to procure and deliver vaccines to low and middle-income countries, needs to be “fully funded”.

And wants a Global Vaccination Plan “to bring together with the required power, scientific expertise and production and financial capacities”.

“Our efforts need to be comprehensive and well-coordinated everywhere,” he said.

The Pfizer/BioNTech, Oxford/AstraZeneca and Moderna vaccines have all been approved for use in the UK, as well as a number of other countries, and need two doses for full cover.

Public Health England yesterday published real-world data showing the Pfizer jab reduces the risk of catching infection by more than 70 percent, rising to 85 percent after the second dose.

Figures from the latest AstraZeneca trials show a vaccine efficacy of 76 percent after one dose and an increase to 82 percent with a second dose after 12 weeks.

Data suggests the Moderna has a first dose efficacy of 92.1 percent, rising as high as 95 percent after two.

Other vaccines available are Russia’s Sputnik V – approved for use in several countries – and China’s CanSino Biologics, which has been approved for military use there, as well as in Mexico and Pakistan.

The British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab said: “Vaccinating everyone, everywhere, is our collective way out of this pandemic and building back stronger.

“The UK is clear that as a world leader we have a moral and national interest in making this happen, which is why we are committing to share the majority of any future surplus doses with COVAX to support the countries who need them most.

“We are already one of the biggest donors to COVAX, helping get more than one billion doses to the world’s poorest people.

“International cooperation has to be at the heart of this effort, so we are calling on the G7 and other nations to step up support to get vaccines to everyone.”

The following data is correct as of February 19.

Afghanistan

American Samoa

Angola

Antigua and Barbuda

Armenia

Aruba

Australia

Bahamas

Belarus

Belize

Benin

Bhutan

Bonaire Sint Eustatius

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Botswana

British Virgin Islands

Bruei

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cameroon

Cape Verde

Central African Republic

Chad

Comoros

Congo

Cook Islands

Cote d’Ivoire

Cuba

Curacao

Democratic Republic of Congo

Djibouti

Dominica

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Eswatini

Ethiopia

Falkland Islands

Fiji

French Guiana

French Polynesia

Gabon

Gambia

Georgia

Ghana

Grenada

Guadeloupe

Guam

Guatemala

Guinea

Guinea-Bissau

Haiti

Honduras

Hong Kong

Iraq

Jamaica

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kiribati

Kyrgyzstan

Laos

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Mali

Marshall Islands

Martinique

Mauritania

Mayotte

Micronesia (country)

Moldova

Mongolia

Montenegro

Montserrat

Mozambique

Namibia

Nauru

New Caledonia

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

Nigeria

Niue

North Korea

North Macedonia

Northern Mariana Islands

Palau

Palestine

Papua New Guinea

Paraguay

Philippines

Puerto Rico

Reunion

Rwanda

Saint Barthélemy

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Martin (French part)

Saint Pierre and Miquelon

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Samoa

San Marino

Sao Tome and Principe

Senegal

Sierra Leone

Sint Maarten (Dutch part)

Solomon Islands

Somalia

South Africa

South Korea

South Sudan

Sudan

Suriname

Syria

Taiwan

Tajikistan

Tanzania

Thailand

Timor

Togo

Tokelau

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia

Turkmenistan

Tuvalu

Uganda

Ukraine

United States Virgin Islands

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanuatu

Vatican

Venezuela

Vietnam

Wallis and Futuna

Western Sahara

Yemen

Zambia

Zimbabwe

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